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Day Of The Figurines, 2005. Copyright Blast Theory. Photo: Nicola Dove.

For more information about Blast Theory's work, follow this link to: Gabriella Giannachi introduces Blast Theory Follow this link for a brief synopsis of Blast Theory's profile


Internationally, Blast Theory has been represented at art fairs and festivals including Festival Escena Contemporanea, Madrid; the Dutch Electronic Arts Festival, Rotterdam; Biennale of Sydney; ArtFutura, Barcelona; International Festival for Dance, Performance and Media Arts, Köln; Palestine International Video Festival and Basel Art Fair.


Blast Theory's own website is at [link]

Since 1999, Blast Theory have been developing groundbreaking research and art practices with Steve Benford and the Mixed Reality Lab at Nottingham University. For more information about Mixed Reality Lab see their own website at [link]

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Currently the most innovative multimedia group in British theatre.
Theater Der Zeit.


In 2003, Blast Theory won the Golden Nica for Interactive Art at Prix Ars Electronica, received an Honorary Mention at the Transmediale Awards in Germany in 2001 and has been nominated for many other awards including four BAFTAs.

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Photo: Gabriella Giannachi

In March 2005, Matt Adams, Ju Row Farr and Nick Tandavanitj were presented with the Maverick Award at the Game Developers Choice Awards in San Francisco.


Day Of The Figurines

The piece is a major new project being developed as part of the European research project IPerG (Integrated Project on Pervasive Gaming) in collaboration with the Mixed Reality Lab at University of Nottingham, Sony Net Services, University of Gotland, Interactive Institute and the Fraunhofer Institute.

For more information about this project see [link]


Mapping players’ real-time gaming via mobile phones from any location, through figurines occupying a model of a fictional city, Day Of The Figurines explores action, identity and interaction in reversals and exchanges between real and virtual social and political spaces.

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Day Of The Figurines, 2005. Copyright Blast Theory. Photo: Nicola Dove

For our evolving documentation of this project see Blast Theory's Day of the Figurines.

from 28 September 2006 you can also follow my record of the game at Gabriella Giannachi plays Day of the Figurines


Day of the Figurines was tested in Barcelona on 15-16-17 June 2006 at Sonar, Advanced Music and Multimedia Art Festival [link]


Day of the Figurines opened in Berlin on 28 September 2006 at HAU [link]


Day of the Figurines opened in Singapore 6-21 December 2006 at the National Museum. For a record of the game at Blast Theory's website see [link] Singapore game comments
Day of the Figurines opened in Brighton on 4 April 2007 at Lighthouse [link]
Brighton Day of the Figurines blog [link]
Day of the Figurines opened in Birmingham on 19 May 2007 at Fierce! Festival [link]

Newsflash

Blast Theory have received an honorary mention at Prix Ars Electronica for Day of the Figurines (2006-) [link]

Blast Theory's new work Rider Spoke opened at the Barbican Theatre in London (2007-)

Matt Adams's Honorary Professorship speech at Central [link]

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Blast Theory describe the premise of the piece: 'Day of The Figurines is set in a model of a fictional city that is littered, dark and underpinned with steady decay. From the Gasometer to Product Barn, the Canal to Rat Research Institute, up to 100 players roam the streets, defining themselves through their interactions. A gunship of Arabic troops appears on the High Street. Scandinavian metallists play a gig at the Locarno that goes horribly wrong. How players respond to these events and to each other creates and sustains a community during the course of a single day in the city.'
Matt Adams suggests that:

'The whole work springs from the architectural location (….) What we're trying to do is make sure that the virtual representation and the real space which sits around it are as seamlessly interlinked as possible, that there's a very fluid relationship between the two (...) the sense of play that you will experience as you dart between real and virtual, and experience the frisson of this difference, is a very important part of the pleasure of it.'

Blast Theory's complex and immersive game-structures distribute player-presence across multiple and incongruent sites and networks.


See recent features in The Guardian [link] and The Financial Times Document Icongeneral_FinancialTimes_pg1.jpg and Document Icongeneral_FinancialTimes_pg2.jpg